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During School Board Recognition Month this October, we would like to thank the members of the Herkimer BOCES Board of Education for their service and all that they do for BOCES and our students! Thank you to: Daniel LaLonde, Thomas Shypski, Jack Bono, Ronald Loiacono, Janine Lynch, William Miller, James Schmid, Michelle Szarek, Linda Tharp and Daniel Voce!
Herkimer BOCES students learn importance of recycling
June 29, 2016




Roseann Norod's class with Tuttle
Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority School Recycling Coordinator Jamie Tuttle visited students in Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES special programs teacher Roseann Norod’s class at the Pathways Academy at Remington on June 7 to discuss recycling and the earth friendly projects created by the students as part of their recent project-based learning activities. Pictured, from left to right, front row: Destiny LaBarge, of Herkimer; Nicole Zeidner, of Poland; Christian Arabia-Everson, of Herkimer; Chance Arabia-Everson, of Herkimer; Hailey Flike, of Poland; Kyleighana Figueroa, of Dolgeville, and Norod. Back row: Tuttle and student Desiray Thayer, of Poland.

For more photos, scroll to the bottom of the story. For a video made by Norod's class, scroll to the bottom of this page.




Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego BOCES students in special programs teacher Roseann Norod’s class at the Pathways Academy at Remington recently used their imaginations to come up with ways to recycle household products by turning them into something useful.

For example, student Caterina Vosburgh, of Poland, developed a jewelry holder by gluing 1-inch cardboard rolls together.

“I can hang earrings in here, and also my hairbands can go in this, so I can find them faster,” she said. “It is better to reuse things than to throw things away.”

The projects and a visit from Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority School Recycling Coordinator Jamie Tuttle on June 7 were the culmination of a science, mathematics and English language arts unit for the class.

Students investigated how trash impacts the earth. Project-based learning activities included exploring how waste is managed, what landfill issues exists and how important it is to recycle.

Students asked questions about what they could do to impact the health of the planet. They explored recycling, reusing and reducing trash, and each student was asked to identify one problem with trash, along with two possible solutions. The questions and solutions were about practical ways everyday items could be reused or ways to save items by not needlessly purchasing items.

The students each identified a real-world problem related to too much waste or other environmental issues and used their creativity to come up with solutions they could make out of household objects.

Student Desiray Thayer, of Poland, used an old plastic bowl covered in pink and blue paper to hold her glasses. She also made a holder for a battery operated tea light from construction paper, cardboard and plastic.

“Now, I can keep my glasses safe, and if the power goes out, I can have a safe way to have light in my room,” she said.

Nicole Ziedner, of Poland, covered rolls of cardboard with construction paper.

“These will hold my hairbands, so they don't get lost,” she said. “I can wrap them around it.”

Kyleighana Figueroa, of Dolgeville, solved her problem of tangled headphones by making what she called a “headphone roundy” from an empty ribbon spool. She also made an organizer for her dresser items.

“My dresser things won't get lost,” she said. “I won't have to spend money to buy these things now.”

Chance Arabia-Everson, of Herkimer, made a unique holder for his glasses from a cardboard roll.

“It is also a race car to play with,” he said.

Christian Arabia-Everson, of Herkimer, made a coin holder that was tiered from short to taller for each type of coin. He indicated he would put money in it to keep it from falling on the floor.

Hailey Flike enjoyed making a variety of glossy paper envelopes. She also used cardboard and construction paper to make a desk organizer.

“I can use this to hold my necklaces and small things,” she said.

Destiny LaBarge cut a plastic water bottle to create a funnel out of the top of the bottle.

“I can collect water and rocks in it, and the water will fall out, and I can save the rocks,” she said.

She also discussed using glass for water instead of plastic containers that fill up the landfills or cost money to keep buying.

During Tuttle’s visit, she talked to students about recycling and how the Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority facilities help the environment.

Tuttle spent time with all of the students individually, as the students presented their projects and explained how their ideas solved real life problems and helped the environment.

The class also presented Tuttle with gifts they made including a recycled magazine gift bag, a bag made from packing air-packs, envelopes made from magazines and a necklace made from friendship beads that were created out of rolled paper.

Tuttle commented on the creativity of the students’ projects and how she could use some of the items such as the gift bags made from magazine pages.

She reminded everyone that anytime items can be taken out of the garbage stream it helps the planet. When everyone is recycling, it makes a difference because it’s also expensive to deal with garbage, she said.




Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Students Kyleighana Figueroa, of Dolgeville; Caterina Vosburgh, of Poland; Desiray Thayer, of Poland, and Nicole Zeidner, of Poland, empty Keurig cups so that the coffee and filters can be composted and the plastic and foil can be compacted to less space in landfills. The class emptied and processed about 500 Keurig cups, composting 2 pounds of coffee grounds and 4 cups of filters and reduced a square foot of plastic cups by half.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Hailey Flike, of Poland, talks to Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority School Recycling Coordinator Jamie Tuttle about Hailey’s use of construction paper to cover cardboard tubes as a way to reduce waste in landfills.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Desiray Thayer, of Poland, points to her eyeglasses holder and a holder for her battery operated tea lights.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Christian Arabia-Everson, of Herkimer, explains his graduated coin saver, made from various sized cardboard tubes, to Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority School Recycling Coordinator Jamie Tuttle.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Chance Arabia-Everson, of Herkimer, shows off a paper bead made from rolling magazine pages as part of a recycling project.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Caterina Vosburgh, of Poland, shows her jewelry keeper and envelopes made from recycled catalogs.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Nicole Zeidner, of Poland, explains a holder she made to hold kite strings and keep them from getting tangled.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Kyleighana Figueroa, of Dolgeville, shows her creations to organize headphones and desk items.



Roseann Norod's students work on and display recycling projects
Student Destiny LaBarge, of Herkimer, explains how she used a bottle cut in half to make a funnel to filter water out of rocks collected from streams.




As part of an introduction to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), students in Roseann Norod's class recently investigated the beginnings of home computers and some of the influential people in the field of technology. They listened to a speech presented by Steve Jobs to the graduates of Stanford University in 2005. Jobs reflected on his life and lessons learned, including a message to never give up, have faith in the potential of good things coming and to “love what you; do what you love.” Students were inspired to create a video using Ryan Huston's song “Do What You Love”   to celebrate their own culmination of the school year. Their creation captures the student’s excitement about learning and their bonds of friendship, and aims to remind everyone to “smile every day.”




 
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